Walker Randolph Smith

Technology enthusiast, proud Eagle Scout, and software craftsman, I have a passion for the web and software development. I strive to adhere to Agile and SOLID principles while always maintaining a constant pursuit of improvement. My interests include UI/UX engineering, learning, and test driven development.

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Walker Randolph Smith

Musings of a software developer

Technology enthusiast, proud Eagle Scout, and software craftsman, I have a passion for the web and software development. I strive to adhere to Agile and SOLID principles while always maintaining a constant pursuit of improvement. My interests include UI/UX engineering, learning, and test driven development.

Promises

Asynchronous programming in Javascript involves a control flow that is not sequential like what is expected from most programming languages. This non-sequence nature is due to the result of a function not being available immediately. In this scenario the program continues execution despite the result of the first function not returning and the subsequent operations on that result not occurring. Asynchronous code may be a result of physical limitations causing the reults to not be instant or guaranteed like file IO and network requests. Asynchronous programming can be a challenging task and it has evolved quite a bit in Javascript since I began programming. In a few short years I have solved this problem like many other Javascript developers: using callbacks, promises, and now even async and await. Each of these approaches changes the structure of the asynchronous code as well as the control flow. For many people seeing the differences between these techniques will actually feel like a stroll down memory lane.

Walker Randolph Smith

Array

Sets, lists, and collections are structures I deal with almost everyday when programming. ES5 brought cool features like map and reduce, but prior to ES2015 I often used libraries like underscore and lodash to help me operate on arrays. These libraries and another, Rambda, are still on my radar since they have optimized many of these operations, however there are a couple common operations I will cover.

Walker Randolph Smith